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Devenish Island Monastery. 1,500 years of Fermanagh History

Devenish Island Monastery. 1,500 years of Fermanagh History

£5.00


The book entitled Devenish Island Monastery – 1,500 years of Fermanagh History details the monastic orders who lived there the Célí Dé and the Augustinian monks and their monastic life, early Fermanagh society, ecclesiastical dynasties in Fermanagh, Devenish as one of our first “towns” and the islands buildings including its iconic round tower. The book has over 30 full colour images with one notable image of the “wishing sarcophagus” in action where a lady is turning around in it so that her wish is granted. The book is available locally at £5 in Fermanagh Museum and the Tourist Information Office as well as local shops. P&P£3.

In his foreword John Cunningham writes “Devenish Island is a special place, a gem, set in the placid waters of Lough Erne – an essential part of who and what we are in Ireland and particularly Fermanagh. Its monastery was not an aloof or elite entity but was home to craftsmen and women, monks and scholars, doctors and nurses, teachers and scribes, historians and poets, farmers and labourers, fishermen and traders and it flourished for nearly a thousand years. We essentially think of it as a religious site and its chief importance lies in its Celtic Christianity.
The Celtic church celebrated grace and nature as good gifts from God and recognised the sacredness of all creation. It had a love of mysticism and poetry, a deep respect for the feminine, included women in its leadership and allowed clerical marriages. The Celtic understanding of church leadership was rooted in its rural and agricultural communal culture, and the great Celtic monasteries emerged from this tribal system.
The roots of Celtic Christianity reach deep into the mysticism of St John the evangelist in the New Testament, and the wisdom tradition of the Old Testament. According to Celtic tradition, when St John leaned against Jesus at the Last Supper, he heard the heartbeat of God. Therefore, St John became a symbol of listening for the life of God in ourselves, and in all creation. Devenish Island is still a place where one can recognised the sacredness of all creation.



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    The book entitled Devenish Island Monastery – 1,500 years of Fermanagh History details the monastic orders who lived there the Célí Dé and the Augustinian monks and their monastic life, early Fermanagh society, ecclesiastical dynasties in Fermanagh, Devenish as one of our first “towns” and the islands buildings including its iconic round tower. The book has over 30 full colour images with one notable image of the “wishing sarcophagus” in action where a lady is turning around in it so that her wish is granted. The book is available locally at £5 in Fermanagh Museum and the Tourist Information Office as well as local shops. P&P£3.

    In his foreword John Cunningham writes “Devenish Island is a special place, a gem, set in the placid waters of Lough Erne – an essential part of who and what we are in Ireland and particularly Fermanagh. Its monastery was not an aloof or elite entity but was home to craftsmen and women, monks and scholars, doctors and nurses, teachers and scribes, historians and poets, farmers and labourers, fishermen and traders and it flourished for nearly a thousand years. We essentially think of it as a religious site and its chief importance lies in its Celtic Christianity.
    The Celtic church celebrated grace and nature as good gifts from God and recognised the sacredness of all creation. It had a love of mysticism and poetry, a deep respect for the feminine, included women in its leadership and allowed clerical marriages. The Celtic understanding of church leadership was rooted in its rural and agricultural communal culture, and the great Celtic monasteries emerged from this tribal system.
    The roots of Celtic Christianity reach deep into the mysticism of St John the evangelist in the New Testament, and the wisdom tradition of the Old Testament. According to Celtic tradition, when St John leaned against Jesus at the Last Supper, he heard the heartbeat of God. Therefore, St John became a symbol of listening for the life of God in ourselves, and in all creation. Devenish Island is still a place where one can recognised the sacredness of all creation.

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